Imagine 2033 Competition winners announced

October 13 / 122

Nat Phillips (Urban Planning), Timothy Watson (Masters of Environment), Matthew Stewart (Urban Planning) and Friedrich von Oldershausen (Masters of Environment) won the Imagine 2033 Competition.
Nat Phillips (Urban Planning), Timothy Watson (Masters of Environment), Matthew Stewart (Urban Planning) and Friedrich von Oldershausen (Masters of Environment) won the Imagine 2033 Competition.

The winners of the Imagine 2033 Competition have been announced as part of this year’s Festival of Ideas, receiving $1500 for their ideas on a post-carbon, sustainable future for Australia.

Nat Phillips (Urban Planning), Timothy Watson (Masters of Environment), Matthew Stewart (Urban Planning) and Friedrich von Oldershausen (Masters of Environment) won the top prize in a strong field of six finalists from across the University. Their presentation 'ECOllaboration - Fundamentals of the Modern Society' was based on their vision for a just, healthy and sustainable post-carbon future.

Winner Nat Phillips said he was pleased to have won. “We had a lot of fun creating the presentation and we are planning to use the prize money to further some of our ecopreneurial ideas, “ Mr Phillips said.

Entrants responded to the following:

Imagine it is October 2033. The transition to a healthy, just and sustainable post-carbon future is well underway in Australia. There is real hope that catastrophic climate change will be avoided. How did this happen? What were the key obstacles, and how were they overcome?

Other entries included ideas on governance and eco-fabric, urbanity, trigger events and community and culture.

Winning entry:

ECOllaboration - Fundamentals of the Modern Society

This is a common workplace in 2033; the majority of people freelance their skills to enterprises, as knowledge, expertise and the importance of collaboration has proven to optimise productivity and job satisfaction. The flexible and dynamic approach to work allows for improved life equilibrium. Contemporary corporations are assessed and rated on social value, and uphold a high level of transparency regarding social and environmental issues. Modern responsibility in business contrasts the economic growth of the past that was consistently associated with socio-environmental degradation. Taking inspiration from natural processes, ecological business models form closed systems that focus on resource reuse and transformation, greatly minimising land, water and air pollution.

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