Woodward Medals honour history and science

October 12 / 97

Left: Professor Ingrid Scheffer from the Department of Medicine (Austin Health) is the winner of the Woodward Medal in Science and Technology.
Right: Associate Professor David Goodman from the School of Historical and
Philosophical Studies has won the Woodward Medal in Humanities and Social
Sciences.
Left: Professor Ingrid Scheffer from the Department of Medicine (Austin Health) is the winner of the Woodward Medal in Science and Technology. Right: Associate Professor David Goodman from the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies has won the Woodward Medal in Humanities and Social Sciences.

By Silvia Dropulich
A historian of remarkable range and versatility and a scientist who has changed the understanding of epilepsy have won the University's Woodward Medals for 2012.

Associate Professor David Goodman from the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies has won the Woodward Medal in Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor Ingrid Scheffer from the Department of Medicine (Austin Health) has won the Woodward Medal in Science and Technology.

The Medals, presented each year by the University, recognise staff for research considered to have made the most significant contribution in their field in the previous three years.

Associate Professor Goodman has made a significant contribution to broadcasting history through numerous publications in significant journals and with top university presses.

His 1994 book Goldseeking - Victoria and California in the 1850s was published by Allen and Unwin and Stanford University Press. His new book is Radio's Civic Ambition: American Broadcasting and Democracy in the 1930s was published by Oxford University Press.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor James McCluskey said among the few scholars working outside the US who really make a difference to the work of historians, Associate Professor Goodman had excelled in a large and extremely competitive field because of his striking originality and persuasive writing.  
 
"His monograph Radio's Civic Ambition: American Broadcasting and Democracy in the 1930s has been praised widely as 'painstakingly researched and creatively conceived' with its combination of careful research and acute historical insight," Professor McCluskey said.

Science and Technology Woodward Medal winner Professor Ingrid Scheffer has shed new light on the severe epilepsies beginning in infancy and early childhood. 
 
This group of disorders, in which infants and children develop multiple seizure types, are heterogenous, making diagnosis and treatment challenging. Professor Scheffer has unraveled many epilepsy syndromes, enabling specific electro-clinical syndrome diagnosis, leading to molecular diagnosis.

"Professor Scheffer is an international leader in this area, and her work has changed clinical practice in the field," Professor McCluskey said.

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