Andrew Heggie awarded Fellowship (Ad Hominem), Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

June 15 / 160

Associate Professor Andrew Heggie recieves the fellowship ad hominem of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
Associate Professor Andrew Heggie recieves the fellowship ad hominem of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

Andrew Heggie, Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics in the University of Melbourne, and Head of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Royal Children's Hospital, has been awarded the fellowship ad hominem of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

One of the world’s oldest and most prestigious surgical bodies, the College is dedicated to excellence and advancement in surgical practice. It traces its origins to 1505 when the barber surgeons (medieval surgeons who most often operated on the war-wounded) of Edinburgh were formally incorporated as a craft guild.

The citation read in part:

It is axiomatic that surgeons proposed for the Fellowship ad hominen have excelled in their careers and have made significant contributions to Surgery in a number of areas. Professor Heggie fulfils this brief as surgeon, researcher, educator and mentor to his trainees and colleagues.

Professor Heggie, who received both his medical and dental degrees from the University of Melbourne, has been the Head of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery section in the Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Royal Children's Hospital since 1994.  He was appointed Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne in 2004 and helped found the Melbourne Research Unit for Facial Disorders in 2000.

His interests include the correction of the facial skeletal deformities and airway obstructions that can occur in infants. However, his work has proved transferable to adult patients, and Professor Heggie has used his skills in the treatment of paediatric and adult craniofacial trauma and post-traumatic facial deformity, paediatric jaw tumours and in the management of facial disproportion in both adolescents and adults.

As an educator and mentor, his commitment to his trainees and undergraduates has been extended to fostering fellowships for overseas trainees in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, as well as supporting the Fellows in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Professor Heggie said the award was unexpected, but that it was “deeply satisfying to have received such an honour from one’s international peers.” 

“This award, while personal, is a reflection of the strength of the many individuals who contribute to our multidisciplinary teams,” Professor Heggie said. “There is a strong opportunity to continue the collaborative approach to the many difficult conditions with which we are confronted.”

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